Fragment: At G-Lounge

Last night at a bar in the City, I met a very beautiful man. Not handsome — beautiful. He had the kind of face that I will be able to see across a long stretch of years. I will tell my grandkids about that man. Anyway, he asked me what I was drinking. “Maker’s Mark,” I replied. “And I hate it,” I added. His lips curled into a smile that made me think of cigarette smoke. He asked me if he could buy me a drink. “Yes, another Maker’s Mark,” I answered. His cigarette smoke smile curled into a question mark. “I’m persistent,” I explained.

We eventually talked about our careers. He hates his job, but it pays him well enough that he can afford to buy people drinks they don’t even like. I told him that I’m a writer. I said that I am working on a collection of poems and a memoir. His question mark smile turned into an arrogant smirk. I thought of Lucifer then. I thought of Lucifer’s pointed tail. I was still talking to the beautiful man, but had already decided that our conversation was over. “How old are you?” he asked. I told him my age. “Aren’t you a bit young to be writing a memoir?” he replied. I hated him then. I hated the way Lucifer’s pointed tail made me think of the smirk on his face.

“What’s to say that in my short life, I haven’t already lived more than you?” I said, put down my half-finished drink, and walked away.

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6 responses to “Fragment: At G-Lounge

  1. This is brilliantly written, especially the shifting imagery. As a Kentuckian, though, it saddens my poor country boy heart that you do not like Maker’s Mark… but it puts you in good company.

  2. I love that you walked away 🙂
    And if this is what the memoir would be like – I’d read it!

  3. Why oh why do “beautiful people” live like there’s a chip on their shoulder and with a false sense of entitlement? Can’t wait for the memoir!

  4. Loved this. Beautifully written, Saeed.

  5. Writing has become like tax collecting. (At least I’ve noticed that this year since I formerly get paid to write). I don’t know if it’s because it doesn’t seem like “real work” to people or what. Never knew there was so much hate for this profession in the world.

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